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  • Isabella Jabbour

How Students are Celebrating Thanksgiving

Arguably the most American holiday of the year, Thanksgiving is celebrated by families across the country. Thanksgiving provides an escape from a demanding school and work life and also kicks off the holiday season. It is simply a day to appreciate the little things that are normally taken for granted in our daily lives while eating delicious foods and spending time with families and friends. Some celebrate by traveling out of town or just relaxing in the comfort of their own home. While the overall message of gratitude that the holiday inculcates resonates with many throughout the country, the ways in which it is enjoyed will vary in each household.


"I love Thanksgiving dinner because we always eat chicken since no one in the family actually likes turkey”

Every family celebrates Thanksgiving in its own way, and Edgemont families are no exception. Many families commemorate the holiday by watching the Macy’s Day Parade, followed by an NFL football game, and a large feast. Thanksgiving is certainly a special time to be surrounded by friends and family with the comfort of delicious food. It also allows for gift-giving and other rituals as well as time to reconnect with relatives and friends. “My favorite part of Thanksgiving is getting to see all of my cousins and do karaoke! I love Thanksgiving dinner because we always eat chicken since no one in the family actually likes turkey,” remarked Aleena Ahmed (‘24).



Food certainly can not be overlooked when mentioning Thanksgiving as many families resort to serving typical ‘Thanksgiving foods’ consisting of turkey, cornbread, mashed potatoes with cranberry sauce and gravy, green beans, stuffing, and pies. “My grandma usually cooks a big meal for my whole family and then we all just eat it together at the dinner table with cousins, ” explained Tony Ge (‘24). However, other families add unique dishes to the dinner table, whether that be their own specialties or cultural foods. Bethany de Guzman (‘24) added that her family “eats lobster and steak with family friends” during the holiday. Another Edgemont family shares “rice, mac and cheese, and a variety of seasonal vegetables” over the dinner table.


A popular tradition in many families happens before completely devouring the meal. The wishbone, a Y-shaped bone in the turkey that carries superstition, is set aside for when the meal is over. Later, two people make their respective wishes and break the wishbone, hoping to end up with the bigger piece and earn good luck for the upcoming year.


The dinner table is also a place to share what each person is thankful for. Although many celebrate Thanksgiving surrounded by their families, dedicating time to spend the holiday with friends is equally as important. “Friendsgiving” has become a newer tradition and offers time to enjoy the company of friends and offer thanks to the people present in your life. One student says that “spending quality time together and making memories with friends is something special for every Thanksgiving.”


Since Thanksgiving marks the start of the holiday season, some families draw names for secret Santa gifts and truly get into the spirit by watching holiday movies. A few notable movies include How the Grinch Stole Christmas, A Christmas Story, Elf, and of course, Home Alone. Thanksgiving also officially marks the time to put up holiday decorations such as Christmas trees, nutcrackers, lights, and elves.



The day after Thanksgiving is equally as exciting as stores all across the nation advertise their biggest sales of the year. Black Friday, almost a holiday in itself, has people standing in lines for hours, trying to get a hold of great discounts to start their holiday shopping. Thankfully, Black Friday doesn’t end when the clock strikes 12, as Thanksgiving deals continue online for Cyber Monday.


No matter how you plan to spend your Thanksgiving, it is still a beloved holiday that provides opportunities for festive joy and the gathering of loved ones.

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